Insight Sellin’

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“To implement insight selling effectively you must be able to identify decision-makers who are not content with the status quo…  There are two buying modes — problem-solving and future seeking — and two non-buying modes — satisfied and euphoric…  If sellers are going to drive demand they must find decision-makers in one of the two buying modes.  If they don’t find such buyers, no matter how good of a case sellers may make, inertia will likely keep decision-makers from acting.”

–  from Two Buying Modes, a subheading within the RAIN Group‘s book, “Insight Selling”

I haven’t read every book on sales, but I’ve read a few dozen of them.  Most of them are bad.  No.  I mean, really bad.  Like the scene in The Blues Brothers where the guy at the fancy restaurant is describing Jake and Elwood’s “aura” — like that bad!

I am at least partly convinced that most sales book authors turned to authorin’ ’cause they weren’t too good at sellin’ — and I’m not kiddin’!

Insight Selling, from the RAIN Group is good.  It’s very good.

I’ve never been a “system guy.”  I’m not a fan of anything that tries to completely process-ize something that has an innately human element.  Like professional selling, for example.

Does the process matter?  Of course it does.  Without a sales process — there’s no way to measure accurately what works and what doesn’t, or where and when it works or doesn’t.  There’s no way to objectively understand if “Steve can’t sell,” or if “the process needs tweaked.”  Without a fundamental sales process, continuity is almost impossible and evolving the business comes down to who’s gut instinct we trust this time.

Insight Selling resonates with me because it’s real and it goes deep on the subjective elements that aren’t so subjective they can’t be evaluated.

Whatever process you deploy, the critical elements to peak producers approach are that they connect, collaborate, and convince.

If you’re makin’ your livin’ by sellin’ it’s a book worth buyin’ — and readin’ — and an approach worth usin’!

Having surpassed a lifetime quota for contractions in one post, I’ll close with this; tomorrow’s post with a quote from The Wizard drives this point even further home.

 


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  1. […] business life, unsolicited advice drives buyers away, demeans them, and violates all three principles of connect, collaborate and […]

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