Book Week IV – Over Rated (Clap, Clap, ClapClapClap)

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.”

–  Harry S. Truman (1884 – 1972), 33rd President of The United States of America

Full disclosure, I wish I hadn’t included this category.

The book that everyone raved about but that we think kinda sucks.  The over-rated book. It’s really a moot point, and to bag on someone’s work is sorta mean.

I chose this headline because I think the meanest thing high school and college sports crowds can chant at a kid is “over-rated!”  Look, the kid is just out there doing his best, and it’s not like he or she does the ratings, anyway.

I’ve recently turned over a bit of a new leaf — in our hypercritical society, and in a world where it seems too many focus on tearing down instead of building up — I’ve decided I’m not gonna comment or criticize stuff I don’t know anything about. I’ve never been a famous author — so who I am to say a book is over-rated?  Some of you aren’t big Malcolm Gladwell fans, and some of you are really not Jack Welch fans — yet their books have appealed a great deal to me.  Who’s right?  Both of us?  Wow.  Whodda thunkit!

So I Chose A Great Book That I Still Like But Has Lost Context For Me

I know, cop-out, right?

The Art of War by Sun Tzu is a great strategic and tactical primer.  Maybe even a standard.  I read it at a time in my career when the game was about the competition — and the book was a game-changer for me.  So why choose it here?  Because the game isn’t about the competition anymore.  It’s about the Clients.  The customers.  The people who buy the stuff we sell.  And, as a means of wiggling at least part of the way out of this conundrum, let me just say that any book that focuses on the competitors and ways to “beat them” is, in these times, over-rated.

Win-Win isn’t a cliche.  It’s a great way to run a business or a career.

So, The Art of War is still a great book.  It’s just over-rated in the context of today’s business environment.

Tomorrow, we close with books that changed the way we think, and the one book I’d take with me to the proverbial desert island, knowing it was the only one I could read, forever.

 

 


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.