Selling — Curiosity

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“Here’s the secret that we don’t seem to understand, the wonderful connection we’re not making:  Curiosity is the tool that sparks creativity.  Curiosity is the technique that gets to innovation.”

–     Brian Grazer, in A Curious Mind:  The Secret to a Bigger Life

It’s simple, yet we stopped understanding too long ago.  Curiosity is a tool and a technique.  It’s a building block for a more fulfilling life, one where we never stop learning.  While we may not instinctively think of curiosity as a tool, Grazer’s point is that we’re taking something very important for granted.

Curiosity can be God-given, but it need not be God-given.  It can be learned, just as it can be unlearned.  In fact, as 3-year-old children most of us have a deeply ingrained curiosity that causes us to ask “Why?” without ceasing.  As children, we’re fascinated by the new thing, the new kid, the new pet or the new flavor.  We’re intrigued and insatiable in our pursuit of understanding — in short, we ask, we dream, we try things.

Until some dopey adult(s) sucks all the curiosity out of us.  Maybe it’s a standardized test.  Maybe it’s a parent without the patience to teach little hands to do something their big hands have done thousands of times.  Maybe it’s a teacher who long ago left the kids behind — all of them, not just one of them.  Maybe it’s a crappy boss, a bully in the hallway or a coach that intimidates instead of inspires.

Just as we somehow unlearned curiosity, we can, and must, re-learn it to be successful in selling professionally.  My friend, Nathan Baumeister, gets it – #unlearningourlearning…

Dad taught me to take care of my tools.  My push mower is 27 years old.  My chainsaw is 24 years old.  My kitchen knives are 25 years old.  My 41-year-old baseball glove from high school and college is pristine, perfectly broken in and ready for my next game of catch, even though all my joints are telling me that I’m done playing.  But that glove is ready.  My mower still cuts like it’s brand new.

So, why does my curiosity occasionally get rusty?  Why is it sometimes left outside where the rain might rust it, remove all its suppleness and dull its edge?

It’s a tool and technique worth taking care of.  It’s fundamental to successful, professional selling.

As #salesweek continues in the Daily Diff, for now, let’s just pledge to get some glove oil and apply it to our curiosity.  I’m curious how much of a difference that will make.

#salesweek #curiosity #teachercoach #unlearningourlearning


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.