Put Some PIT in The Calendar

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much can be done if we are always doing.”

          –     Thomas Jefferson (1743 – 1826), 3rd President of The United States

“Don’t just do something!  Stand there!”

–     Dick Heston (1933 – 2002), my dad, a farmer, factory-worker and brilliant business leadership mind

Wow.  Turns out Dad was smarter than Thomas Jefferson.

I like most of what Jefferson said and I’m forever thankful for the impact he had on our country — as much as you can be in an election year where stupid runs rampant at every TV timeout in whatever game I’m watching….but I digress…

A quick check of the calendar today shows only two meetings, one of which is ten minutes long.  This is an absolute gift.  I’ll be able to leverage effectiveness instead of getting my butt kicked by busy-ness today!  Busy-ness is a dangerous addiction, and it’s one of those things that snowballs on us, in a not-building-a-snowman-with-the-kids sort of way.

Getting Time in The PIT

See, Dad knew that it’s not idle time that hamstrings us, it’s an idle mind.  Difference makers set aside time in The PIT.  To focus.  To figure out what to do next, and to reflect on what we’ve done prior.  Even during harvest and planting, Dad would make time to lean on the gate, watch the calves eat their feed and willingly step into “The PIT.”

“The PIT” is the key to a productive calendar.  Purposeful time to Plan, Ideate and Think will make a difference for us, for those with whom we work, and especially for those who count on us for leadership.

Why?

Plans are the maps that let us know if we’re on track, if we’re moving and in what direction.

Ideas are the currency of Difference Makers.  Ideas begin with “what if…”, “I wonder why…” and “if I had a magic wand…”

Thinking might seem the simplest of the three, yet context matters, or we can be susceptible to analysis paralysis.  Thinking is spending time in consideration, assessing, projecting and self-challenging.  Thinking is not reacting.  Reacting is superimposing the sum of our experiences and biases in a hair-trigger flash and jumping, based on the way we’ve always jumped before.

Thinking takes time to go a couple layers deeper than a packed calendar permits.  Thinking may well involve a blank piece of paper (ideally Levenger paper), a “feels-right-in-our-hand” pen or pencil and a willingness to shut off the phone, kill the computer and, one topic at a time — go deeper in our brain.

Finding Time To Lean on The Gate

To Jefferson’s credit, idle hands might well be the devil’s workshop, and to Dad’s credit, we can keep the devil at bay if we’re occasionally leaning on the gate, focused on the right things for the future.  I’d combine the two approaches and state my claim; an idle mind might be worth avoiding, but calming our hands and feet so our mind can engage with focus — that’s a calling worth heeding.

Today, I’m gonna do some gate-leaning in Dad’s name.  Got my Levenger paper and my comfy pen and pencil, and a whole lotta things that deserve my PIT time…

Make it a great day…

 


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Speak Your Mind

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.